Center for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, U.S. Department of Education

Mission:
The goal of the Center is to break down existing barriers and to empower faith-based and community groups to provide social and education services to those in need.

Purpose of Site:
The Web site, part of the U.S. Department of Education's site, provides basic information for qualifying organizations to help them begin the process of applying for a grant funded by the Department of Education.

Background:
On January 29, 2001 President Bush issued executive orders that established a White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives and corresponding Centers at the Department of Education and the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Justice, and Housing and Urban Development. Each of the five Centers for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives subsequently conducted surveys of their programs to identify any illegitimate barriers to the full participation of faith-based and community groups and to study how the programs might be made more accessible to faith-based and community groups.

The Center at the Department of Education is also helping with the implementation of the new "No Child Left Behind Act" by harnessing the abilities of faith-based and community organizations to ensure that every child meets his or her full potential.

Home Page:
The Department of Education's toolbar is displayed across the top of the Center's home page, and a toolbar specific to the Center runs along the left side of the page. Its links include: Frequently Asked Questions, Fact Sheet, Tips for Novice Grant Seekers, Guide to Grant Programs, Access Faith-Based and Community Centers at Other Federal Agencies, Additional Resources, Contact Us, and No Child Left Behind Act 2001. The main body of the page welcomes users and offers a brief introduction to the Center, while the right side of the page features links to news items on the site.

Outstanding Feature:
The Guide to Grant Programs provides general information about the department's funding activities and outlines which groups are eligible to apply. The entire guide is on one page to allow for convenient printing, but users can also click on links from the table of contents to jump to specific information. The guide offers links to a glossary of grantmaking terms, descriptive information about grant programs ranging from Early Reading First to Community Technology Centers, and detailed contact and deadline information.

Honorable Mention:
The Tips for Novice Grant Seekers section of the site is a helpful resource for those new to the field. It provides eight concise steps, with embedded links to more detailed information and materials, including a sample grant application (21 pages, PDF).

Director: John J. Porter
Main Office:
555 New Jersey Ave., NW
Suite 410
Washington, District of Columbia 20208-8300
Tel: (202) 219-1741
Tel: (202) 208-1689
Subjects: education

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