University of Maryland Cancer Center Receives $25 Million

University of Maryland Cancer Center Receives $25 Million

The  has announced a $25 million gift from Baltimore-area businessman Leonard Stoler and his wife, Roslyn, in support of its cancer center.

The largest gift ever to the  will help fund construction of a patient care tower, enabling the  to provide technologically advanced, integrated care to cancer patients. If approved, UMMC plans to break ground on the proposed 130,000-square-foot building — which will be named for the Stolers — in late 2020, with an opening scheduled for early 2023. Maryland governor Larry Hogan, who was successfully treated for non-Hodgkin lymphoma at the cancer center, has committed $125 million in state funds for the $175 million project.

Roslyn Stoler, who serves on the board of UMGCCC, and Leonard Stoler, who serves on the board of UMMS, made a gift nearly fifteen years ago toward construction of the cancer center's outpatient facility, which is named for them. In 2013, the Stolers also provided the funds for a chemotherapy robot that prepares drug doses three times faster than a pharmacist or technician; the robot was named for their granddaughter, who was successfully treated for pediatric cancer at UMMC.

"This new building, which will house both inpatient and outpatient cancer care, will be a huge leap forward in the history of the Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center," said Kevin J. Cullen, the Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Distinguished Professor of Oncology at the  and director of  UMGCCC. "The cancer center's new home will be designed from the ground up with the optimal patient experience in mind."

"Our deepest wish is that we can bring some light to people who are suffering physically and mentally. If we help them in any way, we're satisfied," said Leonard Stoler. "I hope that we can make a difference. I really do. We're going to do our best."