Carver Charitable Trust Awards $45 Million to University of Iowa

Carver Charitable Trust Awards $45 Million to University of Iowa

The has announced a $45 million gift from the to establish a cross-disciplinary neuroscience institute within the .

The university will use the funds to transform its existing brain research center into the Iowa Neuroscience Institute, bringing together biologists, computer scientists, neuropsychologists, engineers, fundamental chemists, biochemists, and geneticists to conduct research on the causes of, and prevention, treatment, and cures for, the many diseases that affect the brain and nervous system. Among other things, the gift will support the creation and maintenance of core neuroscience laboratories, Research Programs of Excellence awards for institute members who demonstrate outstanding research leadership, and the establishment of five faculty chairs, four professorships, and ten junior-level investigators. In recognition of the gift, the university will ensure that no future individual or corporate name can be attached to the institute, pending approval of its board of regents.

The largest gift to the university's ongoing fundraising campaign — which has raised $1.85 billion to date, surpassing its $1.7 billion goal — brings total support for the university from the Carver Charitable Trust and Roy J. Carver, who died in 1981, and his wife, Lucille, to more than $195 million. In 2002, the College of Medicine was named after the Carvers in recognition of the more than $90 million they and their foundation had given to the school in support of medical research.

"This funding will provide program and endowment support that is intended to bring greater attention to the exceptional neuroscience programs already existing on campus, as well as assist in facilitating a coalescence of these programs around the newly named institute director," said Troy Ross, executive administrator of the Carver Charitable Trust. "In addition, we anticipate that this investment will serve as a magnet of sorts to attract additional accomplished investigators to the university to form an influential core group of scientists with the potential to substantially advance this emerging field of research over the next decade and beyond."