The Geography of Incarceration

The Geography of Incarceration

The rate of incarceration in some high-poverty Boston neighborhoods has reached a "tipping point" where any further increase would damage the social ties that contribute to neighborhood stability and negatively affect public safety, a report from the , (MassINC), and the finds. The report, (11 pages, PDF), examined the rate and costs of incarceration by neighborhood and found that in some nighborhoods more than 20 percent of male residents between the ages of 25 and 29 were incarcerated — affecting nearly half of all households in the community. To address the destabilization of neighborhoods disproportionately affected by high incarceration rates, primarily communities of color, the report calls for replacing mandatory minimum sentences with evidence-based approaches to sentencing; redesigning corrections facilities to provide substance abuse treatment, education, and reentry services aimed at reducing recidivism; putting more focus on jail diversion and pretrial services in high-incarceration-rate communities; and developing complementary community-based strategies to improve outcomes for young men of color.