Segregating California’s Future: Inequality and Its Alternative 60 Years After Brown v. Board of Education

Segregating California’s Future: Inequality and Its Alternative 60 Years After Brown v. Board of Education

California, which has been without a school integration policy since the 1990s, has seen a significant increase in the segregation of African-American and Latino students over the past two decades, a report from the at the finds. According to the report, (62 pages, PDF), African-American and Latino students are concentrated in schools that have lower state Academic Performance Index ratings and where, on average, more than two-thirds of the students are poor, while a far larger share of whites and Asians attend highly rated schools. This double segregation by race and poverty is compounded by the increase in and concentration of English-language learners (ELL), who are primarily Latino and in lower-performing schools. While the report's authors applaud the enactment in 2013 of the state's Local Control Funding Formula, they also argue that an effort to systematically analyze patterns of segregation by race, poverty, language, and region and correlate those patterns to unequal opportunities and outcomes is urgently needed.