Family Residential Instability: What Can States and Localities Do?

Family Residential Instability: What Can States and Localities Do?

Low-income families experience residential instability — even if they are not homeless — at high rates, often as a result of a combination of household characteristics, housing unit conditions, neighborhood dynamics, regional housing market dynamics, broader economic conditions, and/or local and federal policies, an issue brief from the finds. Based on insights from practitioners, advocates, public officials, researchers, and funders, the brief, (11 pages, PDF), argues that states and localities can reduce the frequency and severity of residential instability and its negative consequences for academic outcomes and health, employment opportunities and financial security, and social and political capital. Funded by the , the brief calls on state and local authorities to increase the supply of safe, affordable housing by leveraging federal resources, making better use of existing housing or parcels, enforcing housing codes, requiring lead testing for rental units, providing legal aid for people facing eviction, strengthening services that help families navigate benefits access or secure better jobs, and allowing children to stay in the same schools when they move.

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