CBMA Turns 10: A Decade of Risk, Urgency and Momentum

CBMA Turns 10: A Decade of Risk, Urgency and Momentum

Launched in 2008 as a three-year initiative at the before becoming an independent organization in 2015, the  has leveraged $110 million in national and local investments over the past decade in support of efforts to improve the well-being of and life outcomes for African-American boys and men, a report from the organization finds. To that end, CBMA has built a network of nearly twenty-eight hundred organizations and fifty-seven hundred individuals; seeded national initiatives such as My Brother's Keeper, the BMe Community, and Cities United; and helped launch local initiatives in cities across the United States. The organization also has worked to broaden the field to include support for black girls and women, narrative-change efforts, and racial healing. According to a survey, CBMA members work in a range of areas — including education (65 percent), youth development (58 percent), mentoring (50 percent), community organizing and movement building (37 percent), health and human services (33 percent), employment and workforce development (25 percent), and criminal/juvenile justice (18 percent) — with two-thirds of those organizations providing direct services. Members also reported that they had strengthened leadership skills in their own organization or a peer organization (63 percent), formed new partnerships with others working on BMA-related issues (56 percent), developed more intentional asset-based framing in their messaging about black males (53 percent), and developed more targeted strategies for serving African-American men and boys (47.5 percent).