'Breaking Down Walls: Increasing Access to Four-Year Colleges for High-Achieving Community College Students'

'Breaking Down Walls: Increasing Access to Four-Year Colleges for High-Achieving Community College Students'

Many high-performing community college students who could transfer to and succeed at a four-year institution are unable to do so due to a lack of quality advising, limited financial aid, and confusing credit transfer policies, a report from the finds. The report, (6 pages, PDF), finds that community college students who receive adequate support frequently excel upon transferring to four-year institutions. Among recipients of the foundation's Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship, for example, 35 percent attended an institution designated by Barron's as "most competitive," while 10 percent graduated from an Ivy League school and 97 percent earned a bachelor's degree within three years of transferring. What's more, the report argues, steps to facilitate transfers would benefit both students and institutions of higher education. Those steps include the development of better advisory systems at community colleges, more active recruitment of community college students with successful academic records by four-year institutions, and better support for those students once they are enrolled.