Accelerating Acceptance 2018

Accelerating Acceptance 2018

Americans' acceptance of and comfort with gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals fell in 2017, a report from LGBTQ media advocacy organization finds. The report, (executive summary, 3 pages, PDF), found that for the first time since GLAAD began commissioning Harris to poll on the issue in 2014, the percentage of non-LGBT respondents who said they would be "very uncomfortable" or "somewhat uncomfortable" with various scenarios increased: having LGBT people at their place of worship (11 percent), learning that a family member (30 percent) or their doctor (31 percent) is LGBT, having a son or daughter who is taught about LGBT history in school (37 percent), having a son or daughter who is assigned an LGBT teacher (31 percent), seeing an LGBT co-worker's wedding picture (27 percent), and seeing a same-sex couple holding hands (31 percent). The survey also found that the share of those who were "very comfortable" or "somewhat comfortable" with all seven scenarios fell by 4 percentage points, while the share of those whose comfort level varied by scenario grew. In addition, 55 percent of LGBT respondents reported experiencing discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation, up from 44 percent in 2016. 

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